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Update situation camp Moria: NOS newshour has given an update on the critical situation on the Greece camp Moria. One of the refugees, already living 1.5 years in the camp, commented: “The camp feels like a prison, or worse: like hell”.

The article continues about the actual situation: “There are no showers, the only toilets available are unusable, and every morning they share half an hour of food for about 1,000 people, but there are 6,000 people in Moria, so many of them do not get food.”

Perspective for the refugees

According to the refugee deal between the European Union and Turkey, migrants who are not granted asylum are being sent back to Turkey. But they must first wait for an assessment from the Greek authorities. It can take years before it is processed. 

Help is needed. It may takes years before the authorities take action. You can help to make a small donation to make the situation a little bit more human.

Photocredit: Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters, from NRC (Lesbos can no longer accommodate refugees). 

Pieter Wittenberg, mede-initiatiefnemer van Stichting ShowerPower- schoon en veilig sanitair voor vluchtelingenWhen I walk through Camp Moria, I smell stench. No wonder: it is like one large rubbish dump.
One can simply not imagine how many people have to dwell in an area of a few acres. Every time again I am shocked by the number of people there, and the circumstances in which they find themselves.

 

What goes on in the world affects me.

My father fled the Nazis and, only because of that, I was one of the lucky ones to be born in The Netherlands. I want to be there for those refugees. They can count on me.

 

Logo Stichting ShowerPower

Saturday night, December 9th, Pieter, Dinne and I took a big step. The situation in Camp Moria is crying out for change.  We decided to stop standing by and to set up ShowerPower instead.  I realise that this undertaking is going to be different from all the other times I worked as a volunteer with refugees either in Athens or on Lesbos.    It requires commitment and the willingness to sacrifice a part of our private life.

I have experienced the importance of others being there for you in a situation of crisis myself.  When a fellow human being is with you in your pain, you feel that the other is somehow carrying you.  I have also felt the extraordinary privilege of being able to offer help, not with material wealth but with the ability to look someone in the eye and recognise another human being.

 

It is so heartwarming to discover that in such a short time span so many people are connecting with ShowerPower and showing their willingness to help in whatever way they can.  The feeling that together you can actually do something gives energy!  In spite of all the sorrow in the world, beautiful things do happen and that gives me joy.

 

Logo Stichting ShowerPower

 

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Update situation camp Moria: NOS newshour has given an update on the critical situation on the Greece camp Moria. One of the refugees, already living 1.5 years in the camp, commented: “The camp feels like a prison, or worse: like hell”.

The article continues about the actual situation: “There are no showers, the only toilets available are unusable, and every morning they share half an hour of food for about 1,000 people, but there are 6,000 people in Moria, so many of them do not get food.”

Perspective for the refugees

According to the refugee deal between the European Union and Turkey, migrants who are not granted asylum are being sent back to Turkey. But they must first wait for an assessment from the Greek authorities. It can take years before it is processed. 

Help is needed. It may takes years before the authorities take action. You can help to make a small donation to make the situation a little bit more human.

Photocredit: Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters, from NRC (Lesbos can no longer accommodate refugees). 

Pieter Wittenberg, mede-initiatiefnemer van Stichting ShowerPower- schoon en veilig sanitair voor vluchtelingenWhen I walk through Camp Moria, I smell stench. No wonder: it is like one large rubbish dump.
One can simply not imagine how many people have to dwell in an area of a few acres. Every time again I am shocked by the number of people there, and the circumstances in which they find themselves.

 

What goes on in the world affects me.

My father fled the Nazis and, only because of that, I was one of the lucky ones to be born in The Netherlands. I want to be there for those refugees. They can count on me.

 

Logo Stichting ShowerPower

Saturday night, December 9th, Pieter, Dinne and I took a big step. The situation in Camp Moria is crying out for change.  We decided to stop standing by and to set up ShowerPower instead.  I realise that this undertaking is going to be different from all the other times I worked as a volunteer with refugees either in Athens or on Lesbos.    It requires commitment and the willingness to sacrifice a part of our private life.

I have experienced the importance of others being there for you in a situation of crisis myself.  When a fellow human being is with you in your pain, you feel that the other is somehow carrying you.  I have also felt the extraordinary privilege of being able to offer help, not with material wealth but with the ability to look someone in the eye and recognise another human being.

 

It is so heartwarming to discover that in such a short time span so many people are connecting with ShowerPower and showing their willingness to help in whatever way they can.  The feeling that together you can actually do something gives energy!  In spite of all the sorrow in the world, beautiful things do happen and that gives me joy.

 

Logo Stichting ShowerPower